Thursday, July 14, 2011

TV Goes Around The Bend

My TV sits, waiting for the repairman from the cable company. It has been this way for months. I have yet to call him. I am suddenly now getting everything I used to get on TV at no extra cost over the internet.

John Stewart : http://www.thedailyshow.com/

Stephen Colbert : http://www.colbertnation.com/

Keith Olbermann : http://current.com/shows/countdown/

Rachel Maddow : http://maddowblog.msnbc.msn.com/

Home and Garden Channel : http://www.hgtv.com/

At the moment I am writing this, I am watching Stephen Colbert's "Colbert Report". It is in segments, but each segment leads into the next. I will be watching whole show.

There are no commercials. It is continuous. The image is smaller than regular TV, but it is free. Click to make the image full-screen. Still a little fuzzy, but livable.

Each show is archived, so you can watch it when you like. You can browse older shows. If the Earth doesn't collide with humanity, perhaps Colbert's art will survive intact for generations.

Cable TV doesn't do this. This is a new paradigm.

A new paradigm is devouring the old paradigm. Making change. Much of the content that cable stations now broadcast over cable they also broadcast over the Internet, making it globally accessible. As more and more people use the internet, the older method of delivery may slowly fall away.

Just link to the web site of the program you would like to watch. Google and ye shall find.

The quantitative incremental improvement (40% yearly) of computing power has turned television, a thing of the moment, into a new type of entity with a third, temporal, dimension. It still is what it always was, but it can also be anything it ever has been.

Continuous quantitative change has generated qualitative change. Just as, in the political world, continuous reform has created revolution.

Moore's Law marches on.

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home